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Kiss Me, Chloe for Sale on Amazon!

Hello, everyone!  Mercy but it’s been a busy two weeks!  I put the finishing touches on Kiss Me, Chloe, sent it to my pre-publication readers for proofing and reviewing, entered changes (typos, etc) and PUBLISHED the book on my birthday, April 10, just as I’ve been planning to do for months!  The reviews will be appearing over the course of this next week.  If you’ve read the book and enjoyed it, I’ll appreciate your putting a review on the book’s page on Amazon.  The link to that page is on this website, along with the cover and the description.  And this past week, our six-year-old grandson, Joey, was here during his spring break from Kindergarten in New Mexico.  Talk about a busy week!  In between bike rides and movies and trips to the park, I was working on Kiss Me, Chloe.  No matter what else is happening, writers keep writing.

By Tuesday, I knew it was time to stop writing, though.  It’s something all writers know and something we all incorporate into the writing of our books.  The writer is too close to the book to be completely objective.  And, the writer is too close to catch all the picky errors!  In “Kiss Me, Chloe” I had her putting on tennis shoes, then later that day kicking off her sandals!  Two of my readers noticed and let me know so I could correct that picky little error and get a corrected version of the book on Amazon.

My proofreaders also catch little typos that I haven’t caught, even though I’ve read the book over and over during the writing.  I get caught up in the story and my eyes skim over those typos, time after time.

I write my books in layers.  When I’m writing the first draft, I get the story written without worrying about typos, inconsistencies, description, or anything other than getting the beginning, middle, and end of the story finished.  Then, comes the real writing.  Layer by layer, I go through and insert descriptions, emotional reactions, additional dialogue, and subplots.  By the time I start polishing, and seeing the final draft in my mind, I’ve probably added ten layers to that first draft.  The final book is much richer and more finely written than the first.

That’s what separates a professional writer from a casual writer.  Rewriting.  I might spend an hour on a few paragraphs, or maybe only a few minutes correcting inconsistencies, like the tennis shoes turning into sandals!  Other times, I may decide to revise the plot completely.  I may add a new character, or a new piece of action that will enable my readers to know the characters better and to think of them as real people.

There’s also a reality that all writers are familiar with.  The book is never really finished.  No matter how many times I reread what I’ve written, I’ll find changes to make.  When I realize that the changes I’m making are putting the words back to where they were two changes ago, it’s time to stop tinkering and declare the book finished.  For the time being, anyway.  Then, my pre-publication readers take over the proofing process.  I make the changes those readers find–but I try not to reread the whole book, or I’ll start tinkering again.

Yes, it takes months to write a 60,000-word book.  But it’s worth every minute I spend to know that the story I’ve told seems like a slice of real life to my readers.

I hope you’ll check out the Amazon page for Kiss Me, Chloe.  If it sounds like a book you’d like, I hope you’ll enjoy reading it as much as I enjoyed writing it!

Click here to order Kiss Me, Chloe.  http://www.amazon.com/Kiss-Me-Chloe-ebook/dp/B00CB7NHC8

 

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